Open Edition

fine art prints by National Geographic photographer Matthieu Paley

Showing 65–79 of 79 results

Soronabod

GreenInstagram
750

Above the village of Passu, a teenager checks his Facebook. Many residents here are Ismaili, followers of a moderate branch of Islam. A sign on the mountain slope commemorates the time in 1987, when the Ismaili imam, the Aga Khan, visited this remote region.

 

Sumatra & Sunita

Lost Highway
650

Sumatra and his wife Sunita have traveled already over 1,700 kilometres. Four months on a pilgrimage following the holy Narmada river, sleeping in ashrams along the way. There was much pride in their eyes.

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Tella Bu II

GreenInstagram
800

The woman facing us is Tella Bu. This was 2012 and I had first met her in 2005, in her father’s yurt, the chief of the Afghan Kyrgyz community. She wore a red veil then, a sign that she was not married. A few months after her wedding, her red veil was replaced by this white one.

 

Tentotumatunot

Lost Highway
650

“I think 32 years old… what you need?”. He was throwing garbages from the bushy roadside back into the road, plastic bags, bottles… Mixing local Gondi language and Hindi, jaw clenched hard. “Take more pictures!” he ordered, shirt button in his ear.

Tsast Uul

From the SteppesInstagram
900

I peeked out the tent to see this. We had  just trekked up Tsast Uul, one of the highest mountains in Mongolia. You would think we were alone, but in Mongolia horse riders would spot our tent from miles away and spontaneously stick their heads inside, just like we would walk into their gers.

Wuruchan

From the Steppes
600

The first time I saw someone smoking opium. I was hesitant to photograph. The younger son of the Khan, Wuruchan Noor Ullah, the ‘king’ of the Kyrgyz. It was raining outside, he was just back from patrolling the Tajik border, some yaks had gone missing, strolling into another country. Afghanistan.

Yimit

To The Snow
900

It was one of these covered days that I like very much. They invited me in, a wedding was happening next door and I needed a break. They had pulled a blanket in front of their door to keep the guests warm.